WHITE GRADIENT 1

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

WHITE GRADIENT 1

BROKEN CABINET

Doug Fogelson uses photography to relate to environmental degradation and form consider-ations of “perpetual change”. Drawn to the aesthetics and process of the natural sciences many of his works utilize a pseudo-scientific approach. Studies of subjects such as dirt and roots or flora and fauna are made via photo-gram and presented as installations.  more>>

When reflecting on its own origins, contem-porary zoo photography invariably considers Garry Winogrand’s The Animals (1969) and John Berger’s ‘Why Look at Animals?’ (1980) as its earliest starting points. Re-examining Berger, alongside the writing of Winogrand’s curator, John Szarkowski, this article explores how this severely truncated history ever came into being.  more>>

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, as technical advancements enabled faster exposure times and better focusing abilities, photography became the most important epistemological tool in our relationships with animals. Made visible, immortalized, flattened, and preserved in photographic plates, animals became essential, visual tokens for the construction of cultural tropes like nature, culture, wildlife, national identity, and gender. This issue of Antennae, co-curated with Matthew Brower (Assistant Professor and Director of Museum Studies at the University of Toronto), and Cecilia Novero (Senior Lecturer in the Department of Languages and Culture at the University of Otago), aims to move beyond the famous and rather negative critique of the photographic medium formulated by John Berger in ‘Why Look At Animals?’ for the purpose of better addressing the multifaceted developments that have characterized the representation of animals in photography in recent history, and more specifically in animal studies oriented critiques.

 

The high number of excellent and thought-provoking submissions brought us to edit two issues, rather one as originally planned. This issue is defined by a focus on photography and animal-objectification articulated through opposed and regimes of opticality: the one of absolute visibility intrinsic to natural history and the invisibility which the processes of slaughter and rendering impose on animals.

IN THIS ISSUE

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#40 — SUMMER 2017

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RENDERED ABSOLUTELY MARGINAL

Doug Fogelson interviewed by Giovanni Aloi

by Dennis Low

This essay explores the representation of animals in Chicago’s Union Stock Yards and Slaughterhouses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries through the optic device known as the stereoscope. The stereoscope—an immensely popular for of home entertainment and pedagogy from the 1850s to the 1930s—allowed individuals to see a phenomenally realistic three-dimensional image by merging left-eye and right-eye views of the same scene.  more>> 

by Zeb Tortorici

This short essay examines a recent exhibition by Canadian artist Brad Isaacs. First situating his photo and video-based work with natural history museum collections and dioramas in a cultural and art historical context, then focusing on a series of 10 photo-based collage pieces titled Tell Me About Your Mother.  more >>

WHERE DO ANIMALS LIVE IN OUR SUBCONSCIOUS?

by Amanda White

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VISUALIZING ANIMAL DEATH

sheep

SHEEP IN HUAN TIE

by Sean Huang - Translated by Zhou Yan

subconscious

Hiroshi Sugimoto began photographing the taxidermy dioramas at the American Museum of Natural History in 1976. The photographs appear at first glance to be wildlife photo-graphy, but upon closer inspection, reveal their unusual nature as taxidermy display. The images themselves exist in a space between the natural and unnatural, the real and the imaginary, the past and the present, to an uncanny effect.  more>>

PRESERVING THE (UNCANNY) END OF NATURE: HIROSHI SUGIMOTO’S DIORAMA

by Jessica Landau

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Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2017

ANTENNAE IS A NON-PROFIT, ADVERTISING-FREE PLATFOR AS THE JOURNAL GROWS IN POPULARITY, WE ARE DRIVEN TO PRODUCE ISSUES THAT ARE ALWAYS BETTER THAN OUR PREVIOUS. BUT TO CONTINUE WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT.

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

This portfolio presents a body of images taken by Sean Huang in 2007. In the text, he describes the taking of the images and relates them to his practice of photography. Huang describes an emotional and unexpected encounter with the sheep that compelled him to take the images. He relates their production to both his experience of the animals' way of being in the world and his practice of Buddhism.  more>>

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

"I am drawn to environments

that are elemental and extreme,

the ends of the earth..."

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BREATHING WITHOUT PAUSING

by K49814

The logic of the system requires that we tell history in several strands. The same has to be different in order to continue. If the develop-ment of their personality is prevented because of deprivation, physical patronising and early death, we can narrate the history of non-human animals as a tale of convenient K49814 other", we can wear their skin and eat their flesh.  more>>

REFRAMING ANIMALS

by Diane Fox

This article, presents an overview of the natural history diorama and the approach to taxidermy created by Carl Akeley in 1886. This history, along with a selection of examples of contem-porary photographers who use the diorama as their subject, is given as background from which to present my body of work, UnNatural History.  more>>

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ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

DOUGFOG GIOVANNIALOI GRAHAMHARMAN CAROLINEPICARD  

LYNNTURNER

RONBROGLIO KATHYHIGH JESSICAULLRICH

HENRIKHÅKANSSON ANDREWYANG ERWINDRIESSENS

MARIAVERSTAPPEN

KENRINALDO MUSTAFASABBAGH CECILIANOVERO DOROTHYCROSS

ANGELASINGER

 

 

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SOMETHING

by Henry Buller

Akira Lippit wrote that animals and photographs produce similar liminal and phantasmatic effects going on to assert that animals were, in many ways, ‘fleshy photographs’. In the 1960s, the ‘street’ photographer Garry Winogrand, who, along with Robert Frank and Lee Friedlander, came to define a particular style of American documentary photo-graphy, took a series of images in the zoos of New York city. Some of those were published in the 1969 book The Animals.  more>>

by Deborah Nadal

Hinduism considers cows to be sacred animals. This has concurred to cows’ stereotypical depiction as religious and political icons, especially in chromo-lithographs that enjoyed a huge appreciation in the last two centuries of Indian history. At a visual level these images were extremely powerful but they did not depict cows as living beings who also struggle, suffer, and die.  more>>

HOLY COWS

THE REAL LIFE OF

GOING ON

by Linda Brant

Artist and psychologist Linda Brant describes her visit to a small farm in rural Georgia where the remains of livestock are deposited on massiveVbone piles. By gathering, cleaning and re-presenting the bones of these animals, Brant mourns the victims and considers her own collective and ontological guilt. Is it possible to mourn the lives of unknown animals? What psychological processes are activated when encountering and cleaning animal remains?  more>>

UNMOURNED

THE

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