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ANTENNAE

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

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THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

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ISSUE 3

V.1 AUTUMN 2007

ISSUE 3

V.2 AUTUMN 2007

ISSUE 4

WINTER 2007

EDITORIAL POLICIES and INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS

 

 

Please note that we are only able to consider submissions relevant to the list of future publication subjects listed on the left of this page.

 

Antennae is a peer reviewed journal and therefore all academic essays will be subject to consideration from Antennae's board.

Original manuscripts will be considered for publication. Information that has been published or is being considered for publication elsewhere will not be accepted unless discussed with the Editor. Manuscripts that appear to meet the objectives of the Journal will be reviewed by the Editor and by the Academic Board before a decision is made on publication.

 

Style Manuscripts should conform to acceptable language usage. Abbreviations must be limited primarily to those in general usage. The Editor encourages the use of more than one pathway of presentation of materials which might allow the reader greater flexibility in viewing.

 

By submitting your article for publication, you grant Antennae the right to reproduce the work and associated images in electronic format or on paper format derived from the on-line work. If the work has been solicited or commissioned by Antennae, the intellectual property of such contribution rests with Antennae. If such category of work is published in Antennae, and this also represent the first published instance for the work, a written request for a re-print needs to be forwarded to the Editor in order to obtain authorisation for partial or full reproduction of the work. Interview questions written for Antennae and relative answers supplied by interlocutors become, upon publication, intellectual property of Antennae and a written request for a re-print needs to be forwarded to the Editor in order to obtain authorisation for partial or full reproduction in other publications.

 

Original articles can only be submitted in English. Send your manuscript in digital format in Microsoft Word documents only.

 

Use of images is encouraged. Authors are responsible for costs and administrative duties involved in clearing copyright for images. Texts related to the work of an artist or other visual material will not be published without the relevant visual material. The standard size for images is 300 dpi.

 

 

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

                           We are accepting submissions for upcoming issues focusing on the following topics:

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What is posthumanist subjectivity? Which institutions, historical events, and philosophies continue to define its cultural coordinates? And how can we move towards new Post- Humanism®TM approaches which disinherit the cultural strictures from continental philosophy and western art practices that subliminally privilege a very specific conception of the Human as universal human? The reconfiguration of methodologies, approaches, and optics demanded by this new ontological turn situates art as the most productive multidisciplinary forum by which to address the truly universal challenges posed by the Anthropocene.

 

Posthumanist discourses, and subsequently conceptions of the Anthropocene, have been substantially shaped by implicitly unacknowledged structural omissions. A foundation level endemic confusion of the specific with the universal critically compromises any anticipated radical paradigm shifts to, as philosopher Sylvia Wynter (2015) would have it, “give humanness a different future.” Again, according to Wynter, it is important that we urgently shift the hollow universalizing terms that obscure the subjective positions of the “we” at the center of popular Anthropocene discourse. This reference point “is not the referent-we of the human species itself,” a fungible planetary human figure, but rather a culturally discreet Human (or Human®TM) with specific anthropogenic activities and relations, both structurally and conceptually.

 

Which new conceptions of the Anthropocene may arise when geographical time collapses with historical time? What new thoughts on the Anthropocene can be revealed when we acknowledge that neither the responsibility nor the vulnerability of climate change, are evenly/universally distributed? How do we disrupt the narratives of the Anthropocene(s) that erase the roles and realities of the non-Human® TM? This issue of Antennae, co-edited with artist and curator Betelhem Makonnen, aims to address the following topics:

 

 

 

Decolonizing the Anthropocene

Anthropocene vs anthropocenes

Subjectivity and geology

Race and geology

The politics of geology

Post-post-colonial futures

Indigeneity, posthumanism, and the Anthropocene(s)

Politics and ethics in the Anthropocene

Anthropocene and  posthumanism in critical race studies

Posthumanism blind-spots

Anthropocene and global inequalities

Climate change apartheid

Reconsidering the “we” in Posthuman discourses.

 

 

 

Specifics:

Abstracts: 1st of May 2020 (Please submit 350 words abstract along with a CV and no more than two images) Selection process is finalized and feedback sent by 1st of July 2020

Submissions of final pieces: 1st of December 2020

Please email any questions to Giovanni Aloi: Editor in Chief of Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture antennaeproject@gmail.com (www.antennae.org.uk)

Specifics:   Academic essays = length 5000 words max

Artists’ visual essay focussing on one project = 10 images along with 500-750 words max statement/commentary  Interviews = maximum length 6000 words

Fiction = maximum length 7000 words

Roundtable discussions = 5000 words

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mycologies

 

 

Over ten years ago, Anna Tsing’s essay ‘Unruly Edges: Mushrooms as Companion Species’ made its unofficial appearance in post-humanist academic circles. In 2011 it was first published in issue 18 of Antennae and then proceeded to spawn the book The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins in 2015.

 

Tsing’s work on mushrooms stood at the edge of non-anthropocentric reasoning, challenging categories and hierarchies to radically redesign conceptions of identity, companionship, and agency. To many, Tsing’s proposal initially seemed extreme, but today, after the emergence of critical plant studies, interest in omnipresent fungi and their invisible ability to support and orchestrate global ecosystems is steadily on the rise.

From Haroon Mirza, Hannah Collins, and Adham Faramawy, to Annie Ratti, Simon Popper, and many more, contemporary artists turn to fungi in order to explore the ultimate alterity of rhizomatic organisms that, while not quite plant nor animal, push our thinking towards new and uncharted eco-cultural conceptions.

 

This issue of Antennae is edited by Giovanni Aloi in collaboration with Anthropologist Anna Tsing and fungal biologist Merlin Sheldrake, author of the forthcoming book Entangled Life: How Fungi Make Our Worlds, Change Our Minds & Shape Our Futures. Sheldrake shows us the world from a fungal point of view, providing an exhilarating change of perspective. His vivid exploration takes us from yeast to psychedelics, to the fungi that range for miles underground and are the largest organisms on the planet, to those that link plants together in complex networks known as the “Wood Wide Web,” to those that infiltrate and manipulate insect bodies with devastating precision.

 

 

Topics considered for this issue include, but are not limited to:

 

Histories and folklore

Mushrooms in literature

Natural History, preservation, classification

Interconnectedness

Companionship

Toxicity

Psychedelia

Sustainability

Culinary traditions

Ecological entanglements

Fungi and the Anthropocene

Bio Art

Representation/aesthetics

Mushrooms and capitalism

 

Deadlines:

Abstracts for all formats: 1st of July 2020 (Please submit 350 words abstract along with a CV and no more than two images) Selection process is finalized and feedback sent by 1st of August 2020

Submissions of final pieces: 1st of November 2020

Please email any questions to Giovanni Aloi: Editor in Chief of Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture antennaeproject@gmail.com (www.antennae.org.uk)

 

Specific formats final submission details:

Academic essays = length 5000 words max

Artists’ visual essay focussing on one project = 10 images along with 500-750 words max statement/commentary

Interviews = maximum length 6000 words

Fiction = maximum length 7000 words

Roundtable discussions = 5000 words