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ANTENNAE

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

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THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2017

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

This issue of Antennae is the first of three instalments entirely dedicated to plants in art and culture. The first focuses on different representational modalities, the second on plant-encounters, and the third on networks. How we represent plants speaks volumes about our conceptions of their being and our intentions as well as responsibilities towards them. And it is the idea of responsibility that drives this extensive publishing project. Artists as well as scholars have the responsibility to move plants to the fore of their preoccupations and to investigate the historical and cultural networks that bind us to them. Plants support all life on this planet and our lack of interest in them is certainly linked to climate change and general environmental deterioration. Paying attention to plants is essential to the possibility of conceiving a better, more equitable, and sustainable future.

 

 

2017-12-02 09.40.16

DOUGFOG GIOVANNIALOI GRAHAMHARMAN CAROLINEPICARD  

LYNNTURNER

RONBROGLIO KATHYHIGH JESSICAULLRICH

HENRIKHÅKANSSON ANDREWYANG ERWINDRIESSENS

MARIAVERSTAPPEN

KENRINALDO MUSTAFASABBAGH CECILIANOVERO DOROTHYCROSS

ANGELASINGER

 

 

CAROL J ADAMS

SUZANNE ANKER

JONATHAN BIRTH

DOROTHY CROSS

CARSTON HOLLAR

GARY HUME

OLEG KULIG

ROSEMARYTROCCO

PAULINE OLIVERO

PETER SINGER

LOISWAINTERBER

CARY WOLFE

 

 

 

Anna Atkins | Sara Angelucci | Gherardo Cibo

Natalie Cortez-Klossner | Mary Delany

Cees de Boer | herman de vries | Elysia French

Harvard Museum of Natural History

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Rob Kesseler | Isabel Kranz |Zachari Logan

 

Kazumasa Ogawa | Patricia Tewes |

Anaïs Tondeur | Amanda White

Magdalena Zamorska

AND MANY MORE

ANTENNAE

42 cover

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

ISSUE 51 — SUMMER 2020

vegetal entanglements

In 2011, we dedicated two issue of Antennae to plants. Well before the emergence of critical plant studies, we posed important ethical questions, challenged representational traditions, and explored opportunities to re-envision our relationship with the botanical world through art. Some- what surprisingly, these issues have been among the most downloaded in our archive to this day and thus continue to invite many animal studies/posthumanist scholars, students, and artists to consider plants as the new frontier of non-anthropocentric thinking. With the critical plant studies revolution now in full swing, we hope that these issues of Antennae will reach an even greater audience committed to exploring and crafting new conceptions of plant-being and plant-thinking through art and philosophy.

 

As always, we’d like to thank all contributors to this issue, including Michael Marder for his initial input, and everyone else involved in its making.

 

 

IN THIS ISSUE

Dr. GIOVANNI ALOI

Editor in Chief of AntennaeProject

34 essays and interviews

featuring key contemporary artists and scholars

329 pages

202 illustrations

MICHAEL MARDER

p96 p139 p113 p142

p 139

p 69

p 72

quotation

Plants are foragers and collectors who do not hoard what they collect but let it go with and as parts of themselves.

quotation two

MICHAEL McCLURE: MEAT THYSELF

by Stefan Benz

1 vision

 

Active as an artist since 1953, herman de vries’s work underwent a transformation around 1975 – a pivotal importance as far as contemporary discussions around the interplay of art, biology, and philosophy are concerned.  MORE >>

 

The illustrations featured in this portfolio are found in Pietro Andrea Mattioli’s version of De Materia Medica, from the 16th-century. Gherardo Cibo’s innovative approach to botanical illustration entailed situating the

specimen against an image of the geographical area it lived in. MORE >>

 

Gherardo Cibo’s

Ecological Vision

Images by Gherardo Cibo

 

herman de vries:

my poetry is the world

Text: Cees de Boer

Image: herman de vries

8 chernobyl

 

Chernobyl Herbarium, a hauntingly beautiful book by Michael Marder and Anaïs Tondeur gathered thirty fragments of reflections, meditations, recollections, and images—one for each year that passed since the explosion that rocked and destroyed a part of the Chernobyl

nuclear power station in April 1986. MORE >>

 

Chernobyl, Plants, and Me:

An After-life of After-Death

By Michael Marder with images by Anaïs Tondeur

 

 

The author explores the phenomenon of intimacy-with-thedead in the context of non-camera plant photography. Non-camera

techniques, such as anthotypes, rayograms and radiography, are based on immediate bodily contact between the plant and the human. MORE >>

 

Weedy materiography

By Magdalena Zamorska

9 weedy

 

In The Paper Garden, Mrs Delany begins her life’s work at 72 (2010), Molly Peacock offers both a fictionalized biography of the 18th-century artist famous for her paper collages. Instead of using flowers as fixed tropes for stable concepts, Peacock focuses on artistic and vegetal processes to disentangle the manifold interrelations between humans and the plant world. MORE >>

 

Slowly Unfolding

By Isabel Kranz with images by Mary Delany

 

Canadian artist Zachari Logan reflects on studying Mary Delany’s Flora Delanica up close in the British Museum archives, describing in detail their delicacy and intimacy. Logan also meditates on the nature of historical collections and museums in relation to his own contemporary practice. MORE >>

 

Paper petals, leaves and skin

Text and Images by Zachari Logan

 

Whilst botanical art and art inspired by plants have always played a more peripheral role to the grander themes of Western Art, the richness of source, its relationship to our health and wellbeing, and its cultural and symbolic significance has resulted in an unequalled richness of visual expression. MORE >>

 

GENUS:

On the imaging of plants

By Rob Kesseler

 

10 genus 3 skin

 

Kazumasa Ogawa was an experimental photographer and printer in Meiji era Japan. His photographic book titled Some Japanese Flowers features hand-colored photographs of

flowers that by far predate the colorful

experimentations of western pop art. MORE >>

 

Kazumasa Ogawa:

Modern flowers

By The Public Domain Review with images by Kazumasa Ogawa

One of Harvard University’s most famous treasures, the Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, counts 4,300 models representing 780 plant species, created by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, a father and son team of Czech glass artists.  MORE >>

 

The Blaschka Glass

models of plants

Texts and Images: Harvard Museum of Natural History/Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

11 modern 4 glass

 

Vegetal impressions

Text: New York Public Library

Images: Anna Atkins

12 human 5 vegetal

 

Painting the vegetal and human condition

By Natalie Cortez-Klossner

 

Isabella Kirkland’s work examines man’s relationship to the natural world through intricate oil paintings in the style of sixteenth and seventeenth century Dutch Master

still life. Her life-size depictions of plants and animals are precisely rendered and anatomically accurate, the result of extensive research at natural history museums. MORE >>

13 impressions 14 arboretum

 

Sara Angelucci’s photographic series Arboretum features found nineteenth-century cabinet cards whose painted forest backdrops have been transformed to allow the trees to take over the figures. In so doing, the forest claims a position in the foreground of the picture, and as the main subject; the figure becomes the ground. MORE >>

 

 

FIGURE as GROUND

Text and images by Sara Angelucci

p 113

p 96

p 142

6 infinite

 

Infinite silences

Elysia French interviews Amanda White

Screen Shot 2020-07-28 at 10.13.11 PM

p 12

 

In my work, I use plants to assist my human hand in the creation of a mediated botanical illustration. The human-plant interaction in the work reflects human-plant interaction in the world. My background as a medical doctor led to my interest in the concept of plants as medicine for the mind and body. I create my paintings outdoors after foraging in my garden and on walks in nature.  MORE>>

Double click to insert body text here ...

 

Anna Atkins printed and published Part I of British Algae in 1843 thus forever entangling the history of photography and that of the vegetal world. This portfolio, however, focuses on her lesser known, but equally beautiful, Foreign Flowering Plants and Ferns (1854). MORE >>

 

BOTANICAL

IMPRESSIONS

Images by Patricia Tewes

1 making 1 making

 

51 COVER 2 unfolding 7 poetry

Arboretum:

Nella Aarne | Libby Barbee | Honor Beddard Sam Butler | Anne de Malleray

Joshua de Paiva | Paul Finnegan | Jenny Gilliam Katerie Gladdys | Michael John Gorman

David Harradine | Pierre Huyghe | Sonia Levy  Jean-Luc Nancy | Richard Pell | Anna Prizzia

Alexis Rockman |Beth Savage | Geoffrey Shamos

Snæbjörnsdóttir/Wilson | Anna Walsh

Phillip Warnell | Yuki Yamamoto