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ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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Although we now see increasing awareness of climate changes issues across academia and popular culture – only a relatively miniscule amount of media exposure has actually focused on reasons for hope. Changing the Psychology of Climate Change aims to identify the many options available to mitigate environmental disasters and, ultimately, potentially fix our climate.   more>>

To draw attention to a production method of image and sound, a number of viewpoints are proposed in this paper to do with cinematic traditions. This brings forth a privilege of contemplating images, within the sounds of electroacoustic music, images of a film,and language-based images in poetry. Engaging with the practice of recording the natural environment, traces of sound, image, and language may point to environments of distance. more>>

Over the past five years, environmental concern has become one of the most pressing issues in contemporary culture—a disciplinary commitment to concepts of sustainability and to the possibility of reimagining responsible futures lies at the core of many speculative realist philosophies. Posthumanism has largely contributed to the decentring of the human in the humanities, but at this stage, it is the newcommon denominator of environmental concern to drive the research of many artists and scholars.

 

This issue of Antennae, along with the previous instalment, gathers the work of scholars and artists committed to rethink our relationship with what once we called the environment. In different ways and through different lenses, they all explore the ambiguities, contradictions, and blind spots that have characterised previous discourses in order to identify new productivities. Thus, the content of this issue raises questions about intentionality in artistic production; it presents the emergence of new aesthetics that challenge traditional object/subject relationships; it troubles environmental rhetoric for the purpose of engaging with irreducible materialities; and it questions the real potentiality art bears in the development of these new discursive formations.

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IN THIS ISSUE

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#36 — SUMMER 2015

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DISTANT VOICES AND ENVIRONMENT OF AUDIOVISUAL ART

Marc Shaus

 

Anastasya Koshkin

My exploration of the bullfrog began by questioning our own habits and assumptions within the post-industrial rural environment. My method of inquiry at the Westbrook Artists’ Site (WAS) is based on the significance of place, experience and engagement in the production of knowledge. The acts of viewing, hearing, recording and creating are mindfully attended in order to reshape the relationship of the non-human at WAS. The project is an active attempt to reposition ourselves in the food chain so that we might better appreciate that we are co-colonizers of the environment along with other invasive species. more>>

Kevin Lair

Earth system science examines our view of Short story with the structure of a modern-day newscast, complete with the sandwiching of truths in between lies. Written after the

author’s involvement in the Occupy protests and post-protest debates, the piece draws on the internal fractions and power hierarchies hidden within the field of sustainability – to normalize these expressions of ‘humanness’ as an everyday wonder, and not a surprising tripping stone.  more >>

THE FAIR TRADE COFFEE SHOP ON MAIN STREET

John Hu

In the Air is a project that brings together Art and Philosophy by looking at our contemporary environments through ecology of air, oil and wildlife. In the Air combines still images and text incorporating quotes by Luce Irigaray from The Forgetting of Air in Martin Heidegger and Elemental Passions. Both books speak to philosophers of the past by inserting the elements (air and water)

as a way to discuss what is essential to being alive (i.e., breath) in order to think about consciousness and being in the world.  more >>

Facebook circle white small URBAN DINNER

THE DINNER PARTY

VOICES

FIELD TRIP

Melissa Deerson

COFFEE

Effective societal response to an environmental challenge, such as ecosystem degradation, is often difficult when science is the major communication medium (e.g. climate change inaction). Rather, societal challenges are addressed most efficiently when ‘four cultures’ of environmental science, creative arts, philosophy & religion, and social science engage fully and equally with each other. more>>

URBAN (Re)COLOGY

Nolan Bade

FIELD TRIP TREES

ALSO IN ANTENNAE # 36

 

Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2016

 

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

WILDLIFE AND OIL:

IN THE AIR

Text and images by Maria Whiteman

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Water Works was a series of ephemeral interventions by a select group of contemporary artists — Doug Fogelson, Jenny Kendler, Meg Leary, Aspen Mays, Linda Tegg, and Alex Wieder — which took place at EXPO CHICAGO2015 using water as their only resource. The series revolved around Water Light Graffiti created by Parisian artist Antonin Fourneau—a digital surface that illuminates when touched by water. Water Works triggered creative dialogue and encouraged viewers to reflect upon the importance of art, technology, and the natural world in contemporary culture..  more>>

Text by Giovanni Aloi

In Conversation with Giovanni Aloi and Elizabeth Corr

 

WATER WORKS

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

This essay details an idiosyncratic nature survey undertaken in Melbourne's sterile, unpopular Docklands precinct. With partici-pants scattering bird seed, counting everything from ants to seagulls to poodles, mapping their journeys, collecting dirt and identifying the few brave weeds, the aim was to re-examine a place that has been stamped heavily with human activity to see what else there was to find.  more>>

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

"I am drawn to environments

that are elemental and extreme,

the ends of the earth..."

CITY

CITY CREATURES

Text by Caroline Picard, Interview Questions to Gavin Van Horn by Giovanni Aloi

City Creatures, a collection of original texts edited by Gavin Van Horn and Dave Aftandilian, sets the model for a new opportunity to think and rethink our relationship with animals in urban settings.  more>>

PONDERING

PONDERING ECO-ART CRITICISM/ECO ART HISTORY

Interview questions for Linda Weintraub by Giovanni Aloi

In order to envision sustainability and implement the means to attain it, a roster of international artists is boldly revamping art’s

traditional themes, mediums, aesthetics, processes, and skills. In the process, cherished art conventions are being replaced. Eco-artists may, for example, reject self-expression, stylistic consistency, and aesthetic appeal in order to integrate the unpredictability of natural forces, or manifest the principle of recycling, or embrace the vibrant interconnectedness of ecosystems. more>>

PHOTOGRAPHIES OF TREES

Ho Rui An

Reflecting on the ways by which trees and photographies are bound up with each other, this essay considers how an aesthetic of tree-photography can speak to a time of anthropogenic climate change. Focusing on the part-artistic, part-scientific Migrant Ecologies Project centred on the forests of Muna Island in Southeast Sulawesi, it reads into the project a labourious attempt at sensing out the uneven topography of nature-culture entanglements ‘from the ground’.   more>>

The role of art, artists, and indigenous wisdom, are critical in undertaking these efforts, to embody different perspectives and to move between and beyond disciplines. Several initiatives in Ecuador on the theme of antibiotic resistance are described to show how science, art, culture and nature can converge.  more >>

FEAR, WONDER AND LEARNING:

REIMAGINING THE

HUMAN-MICROBE STORY

 

 

Text by Mary Murray, Satya Sivaraman, Kléver Calle, Jennifer Spiegel, Janet DeBoos, Annalee Yassi, Arturo Quizhpe

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