WHITE GRADIENT 1

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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PLASTIC IS WASHED UP

Dianna Cohen is the co-founder of the Plastic Pollution Coalition, a group that addresses the pervasive problem of plastic pollution. She was inspired to co-found the group by her work as an artist -- because her chosen material is the ubiquitous plastic bag. She writes: "Having worked with the plastic bag as my primary material for the past twenty-three years, all of the obvious references to recycling, first-world culture, class, high and low art give way to an almost formal process which reflects the unique flexibility of the medium." With the Plastic Pollution Coalition, she helps to raise awareness of ocean waste -- the majority of which is non-degradable plastic – and everyday strategies to cut down the amount of plastic we use and throw away..  more>>

Brandon Ballengée explores the boundaries between art, science and technology by creating artworks from information generated by ecological field trips. Brandon's work includes environmental art and scientific research that encourages discussion about the human effects on the planet. Here he discusses his most recent body of work with Katia Berg.  more>>

From its primordial connotation as life giver and taker, its role as the ultimate stage for man’s challenging of the natural sublime, and the sheer beauty of its ever-changing ‘moods’, the sea has historically been a great source of artistic inspiration. Biblical scriptures constructed it as a site of the miraculous whilst in classical mythology it was populated by monstrous and enchanting creatures that helped or made more dangerous Homer’s and Ulysses’ journeys. Culturally, the sea has mostly been about us, what it has enabled mankind to achieve, overcome, surpass—it has for centuries embodied the essence of the ‘sublime adventure’ set against the depths of the unknown as immanent and transcendental entities alike.  However, our mythical relationship to the sea was demystified, albeit only in part, by the development of scientific technologies which enabled new, clearer visions to emerge from the abyss.

 

This issue of Antennae continues our journey across these waters with the aim of proposing new, alternative perspectives in our relationship with the sea and representation, while most especially  focusing on those less iconic marine creatures which most often remain unrepresented in Western culture.

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IN THIS ISSUE

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#29 — AUTUMN 2014

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BRANDON BALLENGÉE – COLLAPSE: THE CRY OF SILENT FORMS

Dianna Cohen in conversation with

Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor

interview by Katia Berg

This paper addresses the Field Museum’s ‘Bahama Islands diorama’. It was constructed in Chicago with fish, including sharks, and ancient corals collected from Nassau with help from an explorer and science-fiction filmmaker, John Ernest Williamson. The Museum sought to educate the public about an ecosystem previously unknown. It also aimed to engross the public in a sublime experience of the wild ocean. I discuss the aesthetic construction of ocean ecology as alien, other and loathsome. I address the impact of science-fiction on the objectivity of natural science. And I speculate on connections between the public spectacle of habitat dioramas and a century of ecological destruction of marine life.  more>>

Ann Elias

The word “bycatch” distinguishes the animals that we choose to kill from those that we accidentally kill. But in this essay I argue that the word succeeds only in trivializing one species at the expense of another. And, on a larger level, it is this real and imagined divide between intention and unintention that is creating bycatch of us all.   more>>

BYCATCH

John Yunker

FIONA WOODS:

ANIMAL OPERA

Woods returns to the gallery, where the sound element is crucial

 

 

by Michaele Cutaya

THE SCANDAL of the

SINGING DOG

The rise and fall of Rayfish Footwear took place within a period of seven months. The story began with the launch of the corporate website, commercial, CEO lecture and online design tool. The startup immediately received significant media attention and seemed bound for success, however, there were also critical petitions against the company’s instrumental use of animals. While almost ten thousand people had signed their own fish sneaker, animal rights activists broke into the company and released all the fishes in the ocean…

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washed up bycatch diorama

SECOND LIFE: CHICAGO’S ‘BAHAMA ISLANDS DIORAMA’

COLLAPSE

THINGS UNSEEN

Samantha Clark Interviews Anne Bevan

unseen

Said Anna Atkins in the preface to her magnum opus, Photographs of British Algæ: Cyanotype Impressions (1843), “The difficulty of making accurate drawings of objects as minute as many of the Algæ and Conferva, has induced me to avail myself of Sir John Herschel’s beautiful process of Cyanotype, to obtain impressions of the plants themselves.” The new medium’s capacity for the expedient rendering of fine phytotomic details was key, but equally notable is its elegant blue and white aesthetic that evokes the subject’s suspension in a boundless ocean. .  more >>

EVER DRIFTING: ANNA ATKINS AND THE BIRTH OF THE PHOTOBOOK

Evan D. Williams

DRIFTING RAYFISH

ALSO IN ANTENNAE # 29

UNSEEN 2 jellyfish

"Even the presence of the things that we do see

is replete with absences "

DRIFTING 2

Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2014

 

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Anne Bevan’s series of artworks, exhibition and recent publication is titled ‘Things Unseen’.  Here Samantha Clark introduces ideas relating to this work and interviews the artist about her research and working processes. The dialogue moves around beaches in the Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland, to underwater sampling of microorganisms and scanning in the science lab. Bevan’s work explores place, edge and sea - things we cannot easily see, through sculpture, print, installation and collaboration with writers.    more >>

FISH FOOTWEAR?

A portfolio of Rayfish Footwear’s campaign

The Desktop Jellyfish Project (otherwise known as To Summon My Life in Jelly) is a story and an installation. It sets out to bring five seminal jellyfish to desktops, and then invites you to find your own — instructions included. I will tell you the tales, out of time, of five jellyfish seminal to my life.

by Helen J. Bullard

THE DESKTOP

JELLYFISH PROJECT

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RAYFISH 2

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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