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ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

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QUESTIONS ABOUT SENTIENCE AND OTHER TROUBLING ISSUES THAT LURK IN TURBID WATER

In this general, strongly pro-animal, and somewhat utopian and personal essay, I argue that we owe aquatic animals respect and moral consideration just as we owe respect and moral consideration to all other animal beings, regardless of the taxonomic group to which they belong. In many ways it is more difficult to convince some people of our ethical obligations to numerous aquatic animals because we do not identify or empathize with them as we do with animals with whom we are more familiar or to whom we are more closely related, including those species (usually terrestrial) to whom we refer as charismatic megafauna. Many of my examples come from animals that are better studied but they can be used as models for aquatic animals.  more>>

Artist Marlena Novak discusses the problematics involved in engaging audiences with the underwater world despite the seemingly overbearing boundaries implicated in interspecies communication.  more>>

This issue of Antennae constitutes the first of two installments entirely dedicated to developing new awareness of less anthropocentric conceptions of underwater life. Together they will trace a journey from the liminality of muddy, and water bogged soil inhabited by earthworms in Amy Youngs’ artworks, to an encounter with frogs (Charlotte Sleigh), and then into the river ways with works by artists Marlena Novak and Helen J Bullard.

 

We open with a thought-provoking essay by Marc Bekoff aptly titled ‘Aquatic animals, cognitive ethology, and ethics: Questions about sentience and other troubling issues that lurk in turbid water’. Here Bekoff poses a number of substantially important and pressing questions ranging from the speciesistic to the environmentalist. Bekoff’s ethicomilitant piece is presented in conjunction with a fascinating conversation between bio/robotics artist Ken Rinaldo and Culum Brown, Editor for Animal Behaviour and Assistant Editor for Journal of Fish Biology. Here, their lively back-and-forth enables us to abandon persistent and convenient myths on the presupposed unsophistication of cognitive and relational modes in fish. It is indeed time to look at fish in the eyes!   more>>

 

 

IN THIS ISSUE

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#28 — SUMMER 2014

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‘SCALE’: THE SOUND OF INTERSPECIES COMMUNICATION?

Marc Bekoff

Tiffany Funk interviews Marlena Novak

Amy Young discusses her experiences creating ecosystem artworks that use an experimental combination of hydroponics and worm composting (vermiponics). Multiple designs are created, which serve as functional models for reducing waste, greenhouse gas production and improving indoor air quality. As indoor, domestic scale systems, these projects challenge notions of home and our ability to share our space with other living things that serve functions outside of the pet relationship. Interdependence with the ecosystem is modeled on a small and comprehensible scale in the home, office or gallery in each of the waste-processing artworks discussed. The flexibility of composting worms to live in soil-based or water-based environments offers hope that humans can also learn to live more flexibly and symbiotically with non-human animals.  more>>

Amy Youngs

Fish cognition lies at the core of this fascinating interview to Culum Brown by artist Ken Rinaldo. Scientific and artistic optics come side by side in the attempt of moving beyond the apparent inexpressiveness of fish faces. Despite appearances, fish are revealed as steeped in social intelligence—a trait that should make us all think twice. more>>

THE SOCIAL INTELLIGENCE of FISH

Ken Rinaldo interviews Culum Brown

FIONA WOODS:

ANIMAL OPERA

Woods returns to the gallery, where the sound element is crucial

 

 

by Michaele Cutaya

THE SCANDAL of the

SINGING DOG

"One becomes strikingly aware of the interdependency of our lives and our environment when one has to negotiate life-and-death situations in the middle of what can seem like an infinite ocean."

 

 

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AQUATIC ANIMALS, COGNITIVE ETHOLOGY, AND ETHICS:

 

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LIVING WITH WORMS IN THE FLOODING MACHINE

novak

Frog is part of Reaktion Books’ on-going Animal series, each volume of which explores the natural and cultural history of a single, well-known creature. In this section Antennae proposes an extract from Charlotte Sleigh’s book. The frog’s life transition, long an object of human fascination, became a visual emblem for evolution. A further visual examination of that emblem by Ernst Haeckel and his followers in turn provided additional evidence for the nature of evolution. The story of the visualised evolutionary frog is, as Daston and Lunbeck write of observation, one of ‘experience ... shaped and sharpened to scientific ends'. more>>

VISUALISING EVOLUTION WITH FROGS

Charlotte Sleigh

Sleigh

After the Run is an installation storytelling told in video, animation and multi channel audio story. It starts with the eel run; a migration that happens each September on the coming of the new moon. As the eels pass through the Delaware River by night, the Great Bear (Ursa Major) is recreated above New York’s Catskill Mountains in twinkling lights. After the run, the story winds into a myriad of conjoined tales, crossing oceans, histories, memories and lives, from Athena, to King John, and me; Helen of Troy.  more >>

AFTER THE RUN

Helen J. Bullard

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ALSO IN ANTENNAE # 28

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"Are we really the only species in

which emotions and the ability to suffer have evolved?"

novak1

"Perhaps it is guilt at the many unpleasant experiments performed on frogs – including the infamous slow boiling – that compel us to joke about them."

 

 

sleigh2

Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2014

Antennae 28 cover

 

 

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28 COVER:CONTENTS:INTRO 2 TURBID WATER 2 3 TURBID WATER 4 TURBID WATER 4 5 TURBID WATER 5 6 TURBID WATER 6 7 TURBID WATER 8 TURBID WATER 8 9 TURBID WATER 9 10 TURBID WATER 10 11 TURBID WATER 11 12 TURBID WATER 12 13 TURBID WATER 13 14 TURBID WATER 14 15 TURBID WATER 15 16 TURBID WATER 16 17 TURBID WATER 17 18 TURBID WATER 18 1 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 2 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 2 3 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 3 4 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 4 5 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 5 6 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 6 7 INTELLIGENCE OF FISH 7 1 WORMS 2 WORMS 2 3 WORMS 3 4 WORMS 4 5 WORMS 5 6 WORMS 6 7 WORMS 7 8 WORMS 8 9 WORMS 9 1 FROGS 2 FROGS 2 3 FROGS 3 4 FROGS 4 5 FROGS 5 6 FROGS 6 1 SCALE 2 SCALE 2 3 SCALE 3 4 SCALE 4 5 SCALE 5 6 SCALE 6 7 SCALE 7 8 SCALE 8 9 SCALE 9 10 SCALE 10 5 AFTER THE RUN 5 4 AFTER THE RUN 4 3 AFTER THE RUN 3 2 AFTER THE RUN 2 1 AFTER THE RUN

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

1 TURBID WATER 28 BACK COVER

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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