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ANTENNAE

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

SUNSET 47 BANNER
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THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Nature is a concept we have shaped over millennia of images, texts, compositions, constructions, garments, and performances. The trees, the rocks, the air, and the water simply are. They don’t care about us, our desires, spirituality, pasts, and even futures. Nature is in our heads. It is a concept inescapably defined by our histories, our desires, our spirituality, our pasts, and even our futures. It is therefore not a surprise that encountering plants always entails a process of negotiation between one’s own cultural background, race, gender, beliefs, and values. Our coming to terms with the vegetal world is always inescapably mediated by tools or contexts, even when we claim to be objective.

DOUGFOG GIOVANNIALOI GRAHAMHARMAN CAROLINEPICARD  

LYNNTURNER

RONBROGLIO KATHYHIGH JESSICAULLRICH

HENRIKHÅKANSSON ANDREWYANG ERWINDRIESSENS

MARIAVERSTAPPEN

KENRINALDO MUSTAFASABBAGH CECILIANOVERO DOROTHYCROSS

ANGELASINGER

 

 

CAROL J ADAMS

SUZANNE ANKER

JONATHAN BIRTH

DOROTHY CROSS

CARSTON HOLLAR

GARY HUME

OLEG KULIG

ROSEMARYTROCCO

PAULINE OLIVERO

PETER SINGER

LOISWAINTERBER

CARY WOLFE

 

 

 

 

Brian Brett | Selena de Carvalho 

Teresa Castro | C. cummings | Dornith Doherty 

Jeff Downer | D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem

David Fox | Dor Guez | Paul Harfleet 

Alex Israel | Joela Jacobs | Max Martin

Carlos Morera | Mike Maunder | Melissa Oresky

Joey Orr | Keith Pluymers | Ebony G. Patterson

Caroline Picard | Dawn Sanders | Diana Scherer  Katherine Ryckman Siegwarth

Merlin Sheldrake | Linda Tegg | Christian Ziegler 

AND MANY MORE

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE

IN VISUAL CULTURE

ISSUE 52 — AUTUMN 2020

vegetal entanglements

The contributions gathered in the second volume of Vegetal Entanglements—a tryptic entirely dedicated to plants in art and culture—focus on the inextricable, actual and metaphorical, links that bind plants to humans. It is in this context that the artists, scholars, curators, and plant lovers featured on these pages stage and analyse original encounters with the vegetal world; they make visible, problematize, deconstruct and recontextualize to show how encounters with plants define our lives in multiple and often unpredictable ways.

 

As always, I’d like to thank everyone involved in making this issue—from the wounderful contributors to those who generously lent their time to peer review, proofread, and assist along the way.

 

IN THIS ISSUE

Dr. GIOVANNI ALOI

Editor in Chief of AntennaeProject

9 invisible 2a plantroot 3a hackers 1a Eden

p 30

p 69

p 72

quotation

The white-yellow ball of sun sets with filmy orange streaks across a dust-filled sky. In this dusky grey light, mysteries reveal themselves. I feel like a star, bewitching.We park down near water’s edge in the moonlight casting its alien shadows across red earth formations, traversing million-year-old dormant volcanoes, soil aged a brilliant ochre, wind blowing across the waves of sun-stripped land.

quotation two 7 pansy

MICHAEL McCLURE: MEAT THYSELF

by Stefan Benz

1 Eden

 

British Artist Paul Harfleet plants pansies at sites of homophobic and transphobic abuse; he finds the nearest source of soil to where the incident occurred and generally without civic permission plants one unmarked pansy.  

MORE >>

 

A photographic project by artist Dornith Doherty, Archiving Eden considers the scientific, ecological, and philosophical implications of

seed banks. The images range from documentary style to lyric compositions,

including X-rays of seeds and the use of lenticular panels.  MORE >>

 

Dornith Doherty:

Archiving Eden

text: Katherine Ryckman Siegwarth

images: Dornith Doherty

 

The pansy project

Joey Orr interviews Paul Harfleet

 

8b justice

 

In her work, the Jamaica-born mixedmedia

artist Ebony G. Patterson recontextualizes gender norms and explores Jamaican dancehall culture. She creates highly entrancing, colorful pieces, which are reminiscent of Kehinde Wiley’s paintings.  MORE >>

 

Ebony G. Patterson:

Botanicals of social justice

Caroline Picard interviews Ebony G. Patterson

2 plantroot

 

Scherer explores the relationship of man versus his natural environment. Through her installations she examines the boundaries between plant culture and nature. What does

“natural” mean in the Anthropocene and is man not also nature or a parasitic species on the rest of his environment?  MORE >>

 

Diana Scherer

Plantrootweaving

Dawn Sanders interviews Diana Scherer

 

 

The Camo Coat Collection explores camouflage within everyday life and ritual from an Afro-Futurist perspective, highlighting methodologies of conceptual, spiritual, and physical protection in pattern and textile. MORE >>

 

Visible/Invisible: In the Luscious Garden with D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem

images and text: D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem

9a invisible

 

The ancestors of plants could not have moved from the water onto the land some 500 million years ago without striking up a relationship with fungi. Today, nearly all plants depend on the

symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi that live in their roots. MORE >>

 

Hackers of the ‘wood wide

web’ : a visual guide

text: Merlin Sheldrake

photographs: Christian Ziegler

3 hackers

 

Cemeteries are complex multilayered

sites where flowers become a symbolic language for connecting to ghosts; they enable the invisible labour of mourning. Rural cemeteries are often sites of refuge. MORE >>

 

Beware of Imposters

(the secret life of flowers)

text and images: Selena de Carvalho

 

Deeply entwined with his home town, Israel’s art explores the iconography of L.A. His Trompe

l’oeil paintings of L.A.-typical plants and other recognizable urban markers pose questions about the important of “minor landmarks” in

our construction of identity.  MORE >>

 

Alex Israel:

Plants and other clichés

Giovanni Aloi interviews Alex Israel

10 cliches 4a imposters

 

The Cactus Store in L.A’s Echo Park is a unique gem in which one can find some of the rarest cacti in the world. The store subscribes to an ethical philosophy that subverts our aesthetic

appreciation of these plants.  MORE >>

 

Cactus Store

Giovanni Aloi interviews Max Martin, Carlos Morera, and C. cummings

 

If doctors said this was your last Spring, what would you do? “Last Flowers” is a collaborative project where a photographer responds to a text about death, public and private property, transgression, and the flora of the Spring.

MORE >>

 

Last flowers

text: Brian Brett

images: Jeff Downer

11 cactus store 5a last flowers

 

Adjacent field, Milan

text: Linda Tegg

images: David Fox

12 pleasure dome 6 milan

 

The stately pleasure domes of the Anthropocene

text: Mike Maunder

 

Dor Guez produces photography and

video installations that explore the

relationship between art, narrative,

and memory, interrogating personal

and official accounts of the past.  MORE >>

 

Dor Guez: Lilies of the valley

Giovanni Aloi interviews Dor Guez

13a valley

 

In this essay, historian Keith Pluymers and artist Melissa Oresky add new material to the compost, building on conversations that began

from a fortuitous collaboration on a historical and exhibition in 2018.

 

Herbarium

 

14a compost 15 1970

 

The current proliferation of work in plant studies includes a host of exhibits that focus on the vegetal. Curators—often in collaboration with academics—seem to be on a mission to cure plant blindness.

 

In the early 1970s, a general plant craze caught on in visual and popular culture alike. Against the background of New Age spirituality and the flourishing of ecological thinking, the 1970s plant mania came as an eccentric blow to the

belief that sentience and intelligence are a human prerogative.

BROWSE ANTENNAE 47

p 43

p 117

p 18

 

Composting in the

 

text: Keith Pluymers and Melissa Oresky

images: Melissa Oresky

 

text: Joela Jacobs

 

text: Teresa Castro

52 COVER

 

Adjacent Field, Milan assembled thousands of meadowland plants in the Jil Sander showroom for Milan Design Week, 2019. In parallel to this artwork, Linda Tegg produced four books of photographs made by her, David Fox, Federico Torra, that documented aspects of the

artwork’s creation and disbandment. MORE >>

 

Plant Craze

 

The 1970s

16 curating

 

Exhibiting plants:

Curating the gaze on

 

Vegetal Beings

 

D. DENENGE DUYST-AKPEM

8a justice