WHITE GRADIENT 1

ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

WHITE GRADIENT 1 34 editorial

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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PETRI[E]’S PANOPOLY

The Petri dish, like a Rorschach inkblot, or DNA’s double helix, has become a popular cultural icon. While denotatively, the Petri dish is a covered glass plate used in scientific laboratories, connotatively, it alludes to something brewing under investigation. In this real or imagined container a concept or a substance, if allowed to ferment, will sprout its hidden dimensions. From seeds, to politics, to toxic environments inside, such a dish brings forth a host of arresting results.  more>>

On August 1, 2013, Adam Stennett began a month-long installation / endurance per-formance, living and working in the 6.5 x 9.5 foot, self-sufficient, off-the-grid survival shack at an undisclosed location on the East End of Long Island. The supplies, food and water Stennett arrived with were all he had access to, and he did not leave the area for the thirty-one day duration of the performance. Stennett designed systems using solar, reflective insulation, parabolic mirrors, LED lights, fiftyfive gallon water collection, vertical grow walls, vermiculture composting for solid waste, and urine collection (for later use as nitrogen rich fertilizer). The artist's mission was to survive physically and spiritually, and to create a new body of work that would be exhibited along with the Artist Survival Shack itself at the conclusion of the performance.. more>>

This issue of Antennae and the previous gather a selection of papers presented at a conference,  Naturally Hypernatural: Visions of Nature, organized by Suzanne Anker, (Chair, BFA Fine Arts Department at the School of Visual Arts New York) and Sabine Flach (Chair, Department of Art History at the University of Graz). As part of the journal's year-long exploration 'beyond human-animal studies' which began in March 2015 with the publication of the first of two installment titled Multispecies Intra-action, Natural Hypernatural's contribution further problematizes the new philosophical and recent artistic approaches to the possibility of viable posthumanist models.

 

The redefinition of the concepts of 'natural' and 'artificial' which so much characterize the Anthropocene are in these two issues embraced by each author in different and original ways. Here, anthropocentric systems are not replaced by zoo-centric ones. Authors thus attempt to grapple with different links and elusive networks between different species, paces, organisms, and technologies. The artistic repercussions that ensue from this reconfiguration of the traditional object/subject relationship are ripe with new and exciting potentialities.   more>>

 

 

 

 

IN THIS ISSUE

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#34 — WINTER 2015

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ARTIST SURVIVAL SHACK

Suzanne Anker

 

In conversation with Steve Miller

and Adam Stennett

My paintings are a visual rebellion of the urban grid. It’s my philosophy that we are psychologically programed by this system, a dominating force that efficiently partitions the globe into quantifiable sections of space and time, divided by minutes and seconds. I work to reclaim these divisions by creating sand paintings, in organic shapes, and acting as a catalyst for a synthesis. For me this is a vital process of affirming life. Each painting is spontaneously improvised, using colored sand, poured directly from my hand. Visually, I combine elements from nature, culture, technology and contemporary art to find the common ground from which to communicate our collective interdependence. My art is about co-existence within the natural order of life, challenging politically, the existing order of beliefs, in a runaway materialistic global paradigm. I imagine each of us as a grain of sand in a painting of billions. more>>

Joe Mangrum

Earth system science examines our view of Earth as a system involving interactions among the different spheres of the Earth, including the biosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and the anthro-posphere. Taken within the conceptual paradigm of the anthropocene, Earth system science reveals the fundamental mismatch between planetary boundaries of the Earth system, and contemporary civilization. New paradigms for an ecological society need to be articulated. For this to occur, western liberal political epistemology needs to be questioned. An emerging systems view of life is at the forefront of this effort. Based on emerging views of nature, cosmology, and social ethics this paper proposes a new discipline, Earth System Ethics (ESE), is established to systematically inquire to the crisis into which we have awoken. ESE is a discipline to take account of emerging ecological worldviews and is suggested as an analytical framework and starting point for a normative framework of principles (principlism) to reduce the indeterminacy of abstract norms and generate an action-guiding framework.  more >>

EARTH SYSTEM ETHICS

Laura Ballantyne-Brodie

A small river runs through the great city of New York. Four-mile Newtown Creek once drained a vast tidal salt marsh that spread its wetlands across north Brooklyn and west Queens. But this vanished ecosystem is not vanquished. The organisms of disappeared communities show themselves in pockets of living space along the Creek. The water of Newtown Creek is alive with immature forms of invertebrate life, ready to re-establish communities long ago suffocated by an industrial capitalism that exploited the natural world to the point of destruction. Human engineering can now turn the seawalls of Newtown Creek into habitat space. By offering life in the water a place to live, new communities will return the favor by restoring water quality. The restoration of the great New York estuary will be a collaborative enterprise between multiple organisms.

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Facebook circle white small 34 7. CHICKEN 34 6. SAND

SAND PAINTINGS

34 5. SHACK

Henry Sanchez

34 2. ETHICS

The eleven scenes of Chicken Little and the Culture of Fear—The Garden, The Bathroom, The Kitchen, The Bedroom, The Jail, The Road The ER, The Main Hospital, The Diner, Poortown and Fox News—contain ap-proximately 500 canvases in varied sizes and more than 4,000 individually mixed acrylic colors. Each is arranged like individual sound bites, held together on the wall by a painted ameba shape.  more>>

CHICKEN LITTLE AND THE CULTURE OF FEAR

In conversation between: Tarah Rhoda

and Nancy Chunn

34. 4. KILLS 34 3. SUN

ALSO IN ANTENNAE # 34

 

Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2015

 

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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NEWTON CREEK

Sarah E Durand  

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Filmed inside an active volcano, artist Janet Biggs discusses her recent project, A Step On the Sun, with artist and writer Suzanne Anker. Biggs often assumes the role of a wanderer in search of unexplored territory, both physically and psychologically. In this recent four-channel video installation, Biggs documents sulfur workers as they extract minerals from inside Indonesia's Ijen volcano. While myriad references to sulfur are embedded in folklore, alchemical texts and ancient writings, this element is compared to fire in its fierceness. Anker and Biggs discus the associative, social, and personal aspects of Biggs' work, including the challenges of working in one of the world's most uniquely beautiful and brutal locations.  more>>

In conversation with

Janet Biggs and Suzanne Anker

A STEP ON

THE SUN

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

The English Kills Project integrates the intersection of art and science with the speculations and promise of creating societal change in a site-specific area. The project takes its name from a tributary of Newtown Creek, a waterway located in Brooklyn, New York that was designated a federal Superfund site in 2009. By taking a socially engaged approach to bio-art that brings community and ideas together, The English Kills Project attempts to find new methods to bio-remediate an obscure, mysterious and historically polluted waterway.  more>>

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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"I am drawn to environments

that are elemental and extreme,

the ends of the earth..."