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ANTENNAE

THE JOURNAL OF NATURE IN VISUAL CULTURE

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

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MULTISPECIES INTRA-ACTIONS

The Multispecies Salon was published in the autumn of 2014 and became an instant academic hit. Bringing together the voices of many exciting and innovative artists and scholars, the book advocated a radical decentering of anthropocentrism; one surpassing in scope and complexity the reorientations already operated by animal studies over twenty years. Here Eben Kirksey talks to us about the key concept of ‘multispecies intra-action’, its origin, applications and potentialities.  more>>

In this paper I have responded to the increasingly blurred categorisation of living beings and the current breaking-down of the classification between “human” and “non-human others”. Through the introduction of examples from my practice-led art/science research into cellular organisms, entomology and European honeybees I have explored these entangled networks and the ways in which they relate to what is described by Barad as an “intra-action” of emergence. My investigations into the nature of cellular life through my first-person research into adult stem cells and my experiences in proximity to European honeybees has enabled me to gain insights into this destabilisation of living systems, inter-species proximity and “non-human others” and link these findings to contemporary research. more>>

This is the second installment dedicated to the topic of multispecies intra-actions. Moreover so than the previous, it substantially focuses on the impact that Karen Barad’s work is having on contemporary artists who respond to the challenges involved in envisioning and understanding the multilayered entanglements that encompass ecosystems, biotechnologies, and biocapitalism.

 

Those interested in further exploring the themes discussed in this issue may find the newly published

The Multispecies Salon, edited by Eben Kirksey, of interest. This collection is an inspiring and informative introduction to multispecies ethnography—new opportunities to rewrite entanglements between ecosystems, humans and other species in which a positively charged multispecies engagement between artists, scientists, and anthropologists is fundamental.

 

 

 

 

IN THIS ISSUE

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#32 — SUMMER 2015

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INTERSPECIES PROXIMITIES AND ENTANGLEMENTS

Eben Kirksey

 

Patricia Adams

Mice have become a companion species to humans but they afford a different time and scale for us to measure up to: one mouse years equivalent, approximately, to thirty human years. Hence experiments for treating diseases, such as cancer, can be played out at a different time, cost and scale—at a faster, cheaper and greater reproduction rate. This paper explores The Cost of Life by artist Beatriz da Costa. Karen Barad’s “agential realism” is used to explore how apparatuses for measuring and treating cancer are implicated in the constitution of humans and non-human entities, such as mice. more>>

Susanne Pratt

Eben Kirksey talks to Giovanni Aloi and Maddi Boyd about The Multispecies Salon and why multispecies ethnographies constitutes a much broader field and perhaps a more productive one than animal studies.  more >>

THE MULTISPECIES SALON

Eben Kirksey as interviewed by Giovanni Aloi and Maddi Boyd

FIONA WOODS:

ANIMAL OPERA

Woods returns to the gallery, where the sound element is crucial

 

 

by Michaele Cutaya

THE SCANDAL of the

SINGING DOG

Gut sounds surprise us: passing through hidden layers of flesh, they burble up questions of bodies’ porous boundaries and challenge common ontological cleavages between inside/outside, human/animal, and self /other. As a project in various media, Gut Sounds Lullaby gestated inside a durational performance art practice that listens into spaces and lacunae between human logos and “animal” bodies. By means of intra-species touch and listening, Gut Sounds Lullaby reverberates with Karen Barad’s radical assertion that “human bodies are not inherently different from nonhuman ones.” From soundings of Barad’s theory and poetics to a material performance in the company of a party pony named Fireball, musician Melanie Moser, listening audience, and an in utero human fetus known as Possible, this newfangled lullaby tunes into intimate, hopeful, and indeterminate openings of intra-species presence and responsibility. The full title of the essay: ‘Gut Sounds Lullaby: Listening with Possible, Karen Barad, and the Party Pony That Therefore I Am’.

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Facebook circle white small 1. intraactions 2. SALON 5. mice

OF MICE AND MEASURE: BEATRIZ DA COSTA’S THE COST OF LIFE SERIES

4. entanglements

Alyce Santoro

3. REVOLUTION

Physicist and feminist scholar Karen Barad's theory of Intra-activity proposes that phenomena (including ourselves) are performatively created in the world's ongoing reconfiguration of itself; it follows that our experiences of those phenomena are also dynamically intraactive. The implications of this new paradigm are profound in every human endeavor, including the socio-economic structures of the artworld. Classic critical questions about audience and aesthetics, social or political purpose, formal issues and functionality must be composted, enriching the soil for a lively new understanding of art.  more>>

ECO ART: THE DECOMPOSITION

OF ART AND THE ART OF DECOMPOSITION

Deanna Pindell

6. decomposition 7. mould

ALSO IN ANTENNAE # 32

8. lullaby

When should we let unruly forms of life run wild, and when should we intervene?

Antennae is a peer-reviewed, non-funded, independent, quarterly academic journal. All rights of featured content of website and PDF publication are reserved. Editor in Chief: Giovanni Aloi. 2015

 

 

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Karen Barad’s concept of intraconnectedness brings to light paradoxes inherent in many commonly held views, not only with regard to science and the scientific method, but also involving common everyday perceptions. By identifying ourselves as simultaneously independent and interdependent, as both observer and observed, and of nature yet separate from it, a cognitive (quantum?) leap occurs: we begin to accept these perceived dualities as merely different sides of a single, shared coin. Suddenly all of us are participatory agents in a phenomenon that responds to our existence, because it IS our existence...all of our existences, all at once. How would our experience of reality be different if existence were commonly imagined to be a collective affair?   more >>

GUT SOUNDS

LULLABY

by Karin Bolender

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae Issue 29 87 Antennae Issue 29 86 Antennae Issue 29 85

Physarum polycephalum (slime mould / mold) is an organism used in scientific research that is commonly found in piles of leaf litter and human composts. Intelligent yet brainless, P. polycephalum forms a fan-like network of tendrils in its quest for food. Each tendril moves almost visibly by cytoplasmic streaming — a pulsing movement of the liquid inside its cell walls. It is simultaneously beautiful and repulsive – an oozing, bright yellow, lace-like blob. This paper proposes to engage in a (s)mattering of Baradian “agential cuts” to draw out the intra-active performativity of this evocative critter.  more>>

by Tarsh Bates

CUTTING TOGETHER-APART THE MOULD

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Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

32 cover

Physicist and feminist scholar Karen Barad's theory of Intra-activity proposes that phenomena (including ourselves) are performatively created in the world's ongoing reconfiguration of itself; it follows that our experiences of those phenomena are also dynamically intraactive. The implications of this new paradigm are profound in every human endeavor, including the socio-economic structures of the artworld. Classic critical questions about audience and aesthetics, social or political purpose, formal issues and functionality must be composted, enriching the soil for a lively new understanding of art.  more>>